Syllabus

The full syllabus is available here: syllabus.pdf.

Schedule

Readings are to be completed by the day they are listed under. The schedule may change as term goes on. The most up-to-date syllabus will always be available via pls18.blogs.rutgers.edu/syllabus. Unless otherwise noted, readings are required and should be completed before class. You are expected to have the reading, in print form, with you in class. If a reading is distributed digitally, you may either print it out or bring your written notes on it instead.

Thursday, January 18. Introduction.

  • Readings for discussion distributed in class:
    • Aesop, “The Ant and the Cricket” and “The Fox and the Grapes.”
    • Franz Kafka, “A Little Fable” and “Before the Law.”

Monday, January 22. Plot.

  • Conan Doyle, “A Scandal in Bohemia.”
  • Conan Doyle, “The Adventure of the Blue Carbuncle.”
  • Bal, Narratology, 75–98.

(Tuesday, January 23.)

  • Last day to drop the course without a “W.”

Thursday, January 25. Genre.

  • Conan Doyle, “The Adventure of the Blue Carbuncle,” continued.
  • Conan Doyle, “The Adventure of the Speckled Band.”
  • Pirkis, “The Redhill Sisterhood.”
  • Frow, Genre, 6–19, 134–41.

Monday, January 29. Narrative discourse.

  • Austen, Pride and Prejudice, vol. 1.
  • Bal, Narratology, 15–29.

Thursday, February 1.

  • Austen, Pride and Prejudice, through vol. 2, chap. 11.

Monday, February 5. Character.

  • Austen, Pride and Prejudice, through vol. 3, chap. 5.
  • Exercise due. “Ironic.”

Thursday, February 8.

  • Austen, Pride and Prejudice, complete.
  • Woloch, The One vs. the Many, 56–58, 62–82. The rest of chap. 1 is highly recommended but optional.

Monday, February 12. Frames.

  • Shelley, Frankenstein, 3–68.
  • Bal, Narratology, 56–71.

Thursday, February 15.

  • Shelley, Frankenstein, 3–118.

Monday, February 19. Textuality.

  • Shelley, Frankenstein, complete, and appendices A and B.
  • Exercise due. The principled essay introduction.

Thursday, February 22.

  • Shelley, Frankenstein, continued.
  • Mellor, “Choosing a Text of Frankenstein to Teach.”
  • Poovey, “My Hideous Progeny.”

(Saturday, February 24.)

  • Paper 1 due.

Monday, February 26. Adaptation and medium.

  • Dickens, A Christmas Carol.

Thursday, March 1.

  • Dickens, A Christmas Carol.
  • Davis, The Lives and Times of Ebenezer Scrooge, chap. 1.

Monday, March 5. Point of view.

  • James, What Maisie Knew, chaps. 1–8.
  • Exercise due. The medium of prose.

Thursday, March 8. Theory of mind.

  • James, What Maisie Knew, chaps. 1–15.
  • Zunshine, Why We Read Fiction, 6–12, 16–36.

(March 10–18. Spring recess.)

Monday, March 19.

  • James, What Maisie Knew, complete.
  • Last day to withdraw from the course with a “W.”

Thursday, March 22. Contradictions and resolutions.

  • James, What Maisie Knew.
  • Rowe, The Other Henry James.

Monday, March 26.

  • Midterm exam in class.

Thursday, March 29. Stream of consciousness.

  • Woolf, To the Lighthouse, pt. 1, chaps. 1–8.
  • Auerbach, “The Brown Stocking,” excerpt.

Monday, April 2. Fiction in history.

  • Woolf, To the Lighthouse, pts. 1–2.
  • Flint, “Virginia Woolf and the General Strike.”

Thursday, April 5.

  • Woolf, To the Lighthouse, complete.

(Sunday, April 8.)

  • Exercise due, 5 p.m. Responding to scholarship.

Monday, April 9.

  • Woolf, To the Lighthouse.

Thursday, April 12. Memory, story, history.

  • Morrison, Beloved, 3–75.

Monday, April 16.

  • Morrison, Beloved, 3–124.

Thursday, April 19. Genre and history.

  • Morrison, Beloved, 3–195.
  • Watkins, “The Slave Mother.”
  • May, Fugitive Slave Law, 37–45.

Monday, April 23.

  • Morrison, Beloved, 3–235.
  • Exercise due. Paper 2 draft page.

Thursday, April 26. Literary politics, past and present.

  • Morrison, Beloved, complete.
  • Alexandre, “From the Same Tree.”

(Saturday, April 28.)

  • Paper 2 due.

Monday, April 30.

  • Morrison, Beloved.
  • Berger, “Ghosts of Liberalism.”
  • Love, “Close but not Deep,” 383–87 (the rest is optional).

Monday, May 7, 8–11 am.

  • Final exam.

Readings

  • Alexandre, Sandy. “From the Same Tree: Gender and Iconography in Representations of Violence in Beloved.” Signs 36, no. 4 (Summer 2011): 915–40. http://www.jstor.org.proxy.libraries.rutgers.edu/stable/10.1086/658505. Online via the libraries.

  • Auerbach, Erich. “The Brown Stocking.” In Mimesis: The Representation of Reality in Western Literature, translated by Willard R. Trask. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1953. Online on Sakai.

  • Austen, Jane. Pride and Prejudice. Edited by James Kinsley. New York: Oxford University Press, 2008. isbn: 9780199535569.

  • Bal, Mieke. Narratology: Introduction to the Theory of Narrative. 3rd ed. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2009. Excerpts on Sakai.

  • Berger, James. “Ghosts of Liberalism: Morrison’s Beloved and the Moynihan Report.” PMLA 111, no. 3 (May 1996): 409–20. http://www.jstor.org.proxy.libraries.rutgers.edu/stable/463165. Online via the libraries.

  • Conan Doyle, Arthur. The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes. New York: Dover, 2009. isbn: 9780486474915.

  • Davis, Paul. The Lives and Times of Ebenezer Scrooge. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1990. Excerpt available on Sakai.

  • Dickens, Charles. A Christmas Carol. New York: Dover, 1991. isbn: 9780486268651.

  • Flint, Kate. “Virginia Woolf and the General Strike.” Essays in Criticism 36, no. 4 (October 1986): 319–34. Online on Sakai.

  • Frow, John. Genre. 2nd ed. London: Routledge, 2015. Excerpt on Sakai.

  • James, Henry. What Maisie Knew. Edited by Adrian Poole. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2009. isbn: 9780199538591.

  • Love, Heather. “Close but not Deep: Literary Ethics and the Descriptive Turn.” New Literary History 41, no. 2 (Spring 2010): 371–91. http://muse.jhu.edu.proxy.libraries.rutgers.edu/article/400855/pdf.

  • May, Samuel. The Fugitive Slave Law, and Its Victims. New York: American Anti-Slavery Society, 1856. Internet Archive. https://archive.org/details/fugitiveslavelaw1856mays.

  • Mellor, Anne K. “Choosing a Text of Frankenstein to Teach.” In Approaches to Teaching Shelley’s Frankenstein, edited by Stephen C. Behrendt, 31–37. New York: Modern Language Association, 1990. Online on Sakai.

  • Morrison, Toni. Beloved. New York: Vintage, 2004. isbn: 9781400033416.

  • Pirkis, C.L. “The Redhill Sisterhood.” Ludgate Monthly 4 (1893). https://search-proquest-com.proxy.libraries.rutgers.edu/docview/3713106?accountid=13626. Online on Sakai.

  • Poovey, Mary. “My Hideous Progeny: Mary Shelley and the Feminization of Romanticism.” PMLA 95, no. 3 (May 1980): 332–47. http://www.jstor.org.proxy.libraries.rutgers.edu/stable/461877. Online via the libraries.

  • Rowe, John Carlos. The Other Henry James. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 1998. Excerpt available on Sakai.

  • Shelley, Mary. Frankenstein, or, The Modern Prometheus: The 1818 Text. Edited by Marilyn Butler. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1993. isbn: 9780199537150. It is essential that you work from an edition of the 1818 text.

  • Watkins, Francis Ellen [Francis Ellen Watkins Harper]. “The Slave Mother: A Tale of the Ohio.” In Poems on Miscellaneous Subjects, 40–42. Philadephia: Merrihew & Thompson, 1857. Internet Archive. https://archive.org/details/poemsonmiscellan00harp.

  • Woloch, Alex. The One vs. the Many: Minor Characters and the Space of the Protagonist in the Novel. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2003. http://hdl.handle.net.proxy.libraries.rutgers.edu/2027/heb.32273.0001.001. Online via the libraries.

  • Woolf, Virginia. To the Lighthouse. Edited by Mark Hussey. New York: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2005. isbn: 9780156030472. Please acquire this edition, which has good annotations.

  • Zunshine, Lisa. Why We Read Fiction: Theory of Mind and the Novel. Columbus: Ohio State University Press, 2006. Excerpt on Sakai.